Domestic violence is a significant problem almost everywhere. In South Carolina, an estimated 36,000 incidents of domestic violence every year are reported to the police.

That means that approximately 36,000 people may be charged with domestic violence – and you can bet that not all of them are guilty. Unfortunately, people facing a domestic violence charge can make their own situations a lot worse. Here’s how to avoid that problem:

  • Do not try to contact your accuser. First, this is likely to be a violation of a no-contact order that serves as a condition of your bond. Second, contact, especially contact requesting that the accuser recant the claim, is unlikely to affect the outcome of your case.  The court can proceed with a charge based on other evidence, even if the victim recants the allegations.
  • Never call or even discuss your accuser on a jail phone. Jail calls are recorded, and prosecutors can listen to your calls to identify evidence that you’re threatening or trying to intimidate a witness. These actions hurt your case and can even result in additional charges.
  • If you’re not in jail, don’t go anywhere near your accuser’s house or job. Find a different way to work and do your shopping in a different store, to avoid run-ins with your accuser. Otherwise, you could be accused of violating your no-contact order.
  • Do not ask a friend or relative to intercede for you. You aren’t supposed to contact your alleged victim in any way, and that includes using third parties.
  • Get off your accuser’s social media pages. Unfriend and block your accuser, if that’s what it takes to keep you away from their social page. You’ll save yourself some grief and reduce the chances that you’ll violate the law before your hearing.

If you’ve been accused of domestic violence, you need an experienced defense attorney on your side. Legal representation is the best way to protect your rights and preserve your future freedom.