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Prison nurse accused of bringing drugs for inmate

On Behalf of | Jan 13, 2021 | Criminal Defense, Drug Crimes

The South Carolina Department of Corrections recently reported that a nurse was charged for bringing illicit drugs into the prison where she worked. The 53-year-old woman worked for Kirkland Correctional Institution, which is a maximum-security prison.

According to the Department of Corrections, the Level 3 facility holds over 1,400 prisoners, most of whom are serving long sentences for violent offenses. Inmates with a history of behavior problems are also incarcerated there.

What led to the arrest?

The arrest warrant indicates that there was a search of the accused woman’s possessions on Dec. 20, 2020. Investigators also used footage from surveillance cameras to build their case against the nurse. The woman was charged for possession of oxycodone and possession of Diazepam, which are Schedule II and Schedule IV controlled substances, respectively. Police also charged the nurse for providing contraband to an inmate.

Potential consequences

A spokesperson has already stated that the woman won’t be permitted to work for the Department of Corrections in the future. However, the woman has not been convicted on her charges yet.

Both of the drug charges are misdemeanors with maximum penalties of six months behind bars and a $1,000 fine. The charge for providing drugs to an inmate is a felony with much steeper penalties. That charge has a maximum sentence of 10 years behind bars, as well as a $10,000 fine.

What to do when facing drug charges

Any person who is facing drug charges may be able to argue that the drugs found on their person were for personal use only. Those facing drug charges should not say anything to investigators, however, until they have contacted an experienced criminal defense lawyer.