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Do you need to disclose your arrest record to an employer?

When you apply for a job in South Carolina, most employers will ask you to sign off on a background check. If you have a criminal record, you might be hesitant to share your record with a potential employer. Do you need to disclose your record to get the job?

Are employers allowed to run background checks?

Employers are well within their rights to request a background check. In fact, some employers are actually required by law to run a background check if they’re considering offering you a job. Having a criminal record doesn’t necessarily disqualify you from the job, but it can make it more difficult to get hired. Depending on your record, some employers won’t hire you if they feel that your background could impact relationships with customers or co-workers.

Overall, it’s best to disclose your arrest record from the beginning so it won’t cause any issues for you later. Since an arrest doesn’t equal a conviction, your employer might not make a decision based on the existence of an arrest record. Additionally, federal law prohibits employers from discriminating against potential employees with a criminal record. However, it’s possible that your record could affect your chances of getting hired in certain situations.

How can you protect yourself after you’ve been arrested?

When you get arrested, it’s important to hire an attorney who can help you with criminal defense. Otherwise, having a conviction on your record could negatively impact you later in life.

Hiring an attorney gives you the best shot at protecting yourself from criminal charges. Your attorney might be able to get the charges reduced or dismissed in court. If they can’t keep you from being convicted, they might be able to get the charges expunged later on down the road.